Distinguished Service Cross

". . . for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations
against an armed enemy. . ."

 

Award of the Distinguished Service Cross. By direction of the President, under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, as amended, and under authority contained in Circular No. 32, Headquarters European Theater of Operations, United States Army, 20 March 1944,as amended, the Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to:

* Posthumous award


*Second Lieutenant ARCHER L. BRADSHAW, 02000965, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations in Germany on 25 February 1945.

Lieutenant BRADSHAW crossed a mine field, charged an enemy position and forced the surrender of an enemy machine gun crew. With two other men, Lieutenant BRADSHAW advanced and forced the enemy from trenches, bunkers and haystacks. After setting fire to a haystack, Lieutenant BRADSHAW and his companions outflanked the enemy concealed therein and forced them to surrender. Lieutenant BRADSHAW killed two, captured nineteen of the enemy and wiped out numerous enemy installations which had temporarily halted his platoon. The extraordinary heroism and courageous actions of Lieutenant BRADSHAW reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Oregon.


Private HOWARD E. BROHMAN, JR., 35892705, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.

On 19 November 1944, Private BROHMAN volunteered to clear an enemy mine field in Germany after two of his comrades had been killed by exploding mines in attempting to reach an enemy pillbox. Heedless of the known dangers of his mission and disregarding his own personal safety, Private BROHMAN crawled forward in the face of enemy mortar, machine gun, and sniper fire to clear a path for an assault team. By his courageous act, Private BROHMAN personally located and deactivated twenty-five enemy mines and cut his way through dense wire entanglements. When he had successfully completed this tedious and dangerous task, the path was then cleared for an assault team to reduce an enemy pillbox, thereby permitting the advance of the attacking troops. The extraordinary heroism and courageous action of Private BROHMAN reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Indiana.


Sergeant GEORGE E. BURNS, 32780093, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in Germany on 5 December 1944.

On the morning of 5 December 1944 the enemy launched a vicious counterattack with tanks and infantry on the company to which Sergeant BURNS was assigned. An enemy tank penetrated the company's position, knocking out the antitank defense, delivering direct fire on the company command post, destroying all communications and wounding the company commander. Realizing that his platoon's bazookas had been destroyed, Sergeant BURNS, at great risk to his life and in the face of direct fire from the enemy tank and supporting infantry, ran from house to house until he found a bazooka and ammunition. Unable to find a covered position providing a field of fire, Sergeant BURNS fired the bazooka from a point in the open skeet, seeking cover only to load his weapon. He fired a total of 10 rounds at the enemy tank, killing eight of the supporting infantrymen and setting the tank on fire with a well-aimed round through the tank's ventilator. The tank was forced to withdraw and, at great risk to his life, Sergeant BURNS courageously pursued it down the open street, stopped the tank with his last round, and killed the crew with his rifle as they abandoned the burning tank. His courageous actions, far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty, are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect the highest credit on Sergeant BURNS and the armed forces of the United States.

Entered military service from New York City, New York.


Private First Class FRANCIS T. CHASE, JR., 32942130, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 3 December 1944, in Germany.

When his company was pinned down by intense enemy automatic rifle and cannon fire, Private First Class CHASE raced across fifty yards of open, fire-swept terrain and gained the entrance to a large factory. Moving from window to window, he placed devastating rocket fire upon the hostile positions, permitting his company to occupy the building without casualties. As an enemy self-propelled gun advanced and placed point-blank direct fire upon the structure, Private First Class CHASE occupied an exposed position outside the building and fired two rockets into the enemy vehicle. The weapon fired directly at Private First Class CHASE, painfully wounding him. Despite his wounds, he continued to fire and forced the vehicle to withdraw. A second self-propelled gun approached, followed by foot troops. Firing his rocket launcher, Private First Class CHASE forced the vehicle back, then fired upon the attacking infantry, inflicting severe casualties and halting the assault.

Entered military service from New York.


Sergeant DAVID L. COLOMBE (then Private), 37486968, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 26 November 1944, in Germany.

Armed only with a trench knife after his rifle had been shattered by shell fragments, Sergeant COLOMBE leaped into an enemy foxhole and singlehandedly captured two Germans. Securing a hostile automatic rifle from the emplacement, he voluntarily worked his way behind enemy lines. As pressure was exerted upon the enemy stronghold by his company, Sergeant COLOMBE killed seven Germans and wounded many more as they attempted to withdraw. His deadly fire demoralized the enemy force, resulting in the collapse of their defenses. Sergeant COLOMBE's valorous actions, performed at great personal risk, reflected the highest traditions of the armed forces.

Entered military service from South Dakota.


First Lieutenant WILLIAM C. DYER, 01295690, Infantry, Company "F" 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 23 February 1945, near Merken, Germany.

Lieutenant DYER was assigned the mission of crossing the treacherously swift Roer River and crushing a stubborn enemy firmly entrenched in a large factory area. Reaching the opposite shore with a half-squad, they were pinned down by menacing enemy machine gun fire from a house. Lieutenant DYER furiously charged the house and killed the gunner. He then led his men to the factory area, stormed eleven buildings and cleverly outmaneuvered the enemy. In all, six enemy machine guns were destroyed and twenty-three of the enemy killed. Lieutenant DYER's brilliant and inspiring leadership, his inexhaustible resourcefulness and magnificent gallantry reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces.

Entered military service from Salem, Oregon.


First Lieutenant KENNETH U. EAKENS, 0526512, Infantry, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations in Germany on 26 February 1945.

Although twice wounded, Lieutenant EAKENS led his platoon in assaulting a huge, strongly defended enemy castle. Defying intense enemy fire, his small group routed the enemy and captured the objective by the sheer force and audacity of his platoon's onslaught. After securing the objective Lieutenant EAKENS encountered two enemy sentries who, from hidden positions, commanded him to halt. Although unarmed, wounded, and suffering from exhaustion, he flung himself upon the two enemy soldiers, disarmed and captured both. The extraordinary heroism and courageous action of Lieutenant EAKENS reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from New Mexico.


*Captain WILLIAM C. FELKINS, JR., 387th Field Artillery Battalion, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 31 October 1944 and 1 November 1944, in Holland.

Captain FELKINS, displaying great personal courage, voluntarily led a patrol across a river and into dangerous enemy territory to drive off hostile troops and tanks which had taken a heavy toll of an isolated infantry battalion. He personally adjusted a devastating artillery concentration upon the enemy positions which killed many Germans and forced the withdrawal of several tanks. As the artillery fire lifted, Captain FELKINS, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, advanced far ahead of the patrol while subjected to intense machine gun fire. As he prepared to lead a charge upon the enemy, he was fatally wounded. Captain FELKINS' heroic actions resulted in the safe withdrawal of 120 men, many of whom were severely wounded, and enabled two companies to maintain their critical position until the main bridgehead was later established.

Entered military service from Alabama.


Sergeant CLIFFORD P. HINKEL, 36709357, (then Private), 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.

On 26 October 1944, the battalion in which Sergeant HINKEL was a machine gunner was subjected to an enemy counterattack which had encompassed the left flank of their position. The enemy had brought forward machine guns and, with intense fire, pinned Sergeant HINKEL and his fellow soldiers to the ground. Entirely on his own initiative Sergeant HINKEL seized his own heavy machine gun and, without fear or hesitation dragged it forward more than one hundred yards through intense enemy machine gun and sniper fire. Completely disregarding his own personal safety, he set up his weapon within plain view of the enemy and opened fire. For more than thirty minutes he poured fire into the enemy position, causing many casualties and neutralizing the enemy fire in that sector. Through the valiant, voluntary act of Sergeant HINKEL, a grave threat to his battalion was averted. The extraordinary heroism and courageous actions of Sergeant HINKEL reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Illinois.


Staff Sergeant VINCENT S. ROHAY, 37395054, Infantry, Company L, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 23 Februrary 1945, near Duren. Germany.

During a difficult attack operation across a flooded river, Sergeant Rohay single-handedly knocked out three enemy machine gun nests, which included a pill-box and three groups of entrenched enemy riflemen. Skillfully using his automatic rifle and hand grenades, he engaged in several hand-to-hand struggles, killing at least fifteen and taking fourteen prisoners. His fearless leadership, courage and heroic accomplishments reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces.

Entered military from St. Louis, Missouri.


Lt. Col. GERALD C. KELLEHER, 0310994, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy in Holland on 29 October 1944.

Lt. Col. KELLEHER, Commander of the Third Battalion, when the column was halted by artillery and mortar fire, with total disregard for his own safety, ran quickly to the head of the column and rallied his men then led the advance by acting as the point. When he observed an enemy patrol of approximately ten men approaching, he ran forward, armed only with a pistol, charged the patrol, and forced them to retreat after capturing two of their number. Later in the day, when his Executive Officer, Maj. Robert Russi, was wounded, Lt. Col. KELLEHER courageously ran to the fallen officer and carried him to the cover of a nearby building, despite enemy fire.


Technical Sergeant HENRY A. MALONE, 34355017, (then Private First Class), 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations in Germany on 3 November 1944.

When the assault elements of his battalion met five enemy tanks and one tank pinned his company down at close range, Sergeant MALONE immediately took aggressive action with his rocket launcher. Exposing himself to enemy sniper fire, he made his way to a coverless position within sixty yards of the enemy tank. Despite intense small arms fire which his action drew, Sergeant MALONE fired four well-aimed rounds, setting the tank afire and forcing it to withdraw. The extraordinary heroism and courageous action of Sergeant MALONE reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Georgia.


*Private First Class FRANK MORALEZ, 37326029, Infantry, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.

On 31 November 1944 in Germany, an enemy tank, supported by infantry, moved into positions held by the platoon in which Private MORALEZ was an assistant squad leader. Realizing the futility of his position and the danger of his comrades, Private MORALEZ faced the enemy fire to secure a more advantageous position. From this position, he exchanged fire with the enemy tank. His fourth rifle grenade found its mark and the tank was forced to withdraw, but not before it had fired a direct hit on his position taking his life. The heroic efforts of Private MORALEZ undoubtedly saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. The extraordinary heroism and courageous actions of Private MORALEZ reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Minnesota.


*First Lieutenant JOHN OLSEN, 01289308, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in Germany on 2 and 3 December 1944.

On the night of 2-3 December 1944 the company which Lieutenant OLSEN commanded was given the mission of assaulting and capturing a strongly defended town. Shortly after launching the attack, Lieutenant OLSEN'S company was pinned to the ground by extremely heavy machine gun fire. Realizing the need for prompt action in maintaining the impetus of the attack, Lieutenant OLSEN, with complete disregard for his personal safety, ran to the head of his company, completely exposing himself to the heavy enemy fire, to shout encouragement to his men and lead the advance. Inspired by the bravery of their leader, the men of the company rose to their feet and followed him up the hill and into the outskirts of the town, advancing against heavy enemy fire. Lieutenant OLSEN then reorganized the company and, at great risk to his life, constantly exposed himself to enemy fire in leading his men in clearing the town. In this operation Lieutenant OLSEN was seriously wounded, but he continued to lead the advance until his company had gained a firm foothold in the town. Lieutenant OLSEN'S courage, tenacity of purpose, and inspiring leadership, above and beyond the ordinary call of duty, is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect the highest credit on himself and the armed forces of the United States.

Entered military service from New York.


First Lieutenant JERRY M. PAGE (then Second Lieutenant),0539364, Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy, as a platoon leader and Company Commander, Company C, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, on 28 November 1944.

When heavy enemy fire from a nearby house threatened his platoon's position on the west side of the Inde River, Lieutenant PAGE, with two other soldiers, charged the enemy stronghold and captured ten of the enemy. Although forced back across the river, he effected a brilliant recrossing and, when enemy fire was encountered from the same house, he and two companions once more assaulted the position, forcing the surrender of twenty-eight of the enemy. Lieutenant PAGE'S courageous and inspiring actions were, in a large measure, responsible for the successful fulfillment of his platoon's mission and exemplify the finest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Michigan.


*Private First Class JAMES V. POLIO, 33299528, 413th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in Germany on 28 November 1944.

On the afternoon of 28 November 1944 elements of the company to which Private POLIO was assigned were advancing toward their objective when they were suddenly pinned to the ground by heavy machine gun and sniper fire from well-concealed enemy positions 300 yards to their immediate front. Private POLIO, voluntarily and on his own initiative, crawled from his covered position and, at great risk to his life, advanced toward the enemy, exposing himself to the merciless fire in order to locate the enemy positions. After ascertaining the enemy's disposition and relaying this information to his company commander, he nevertheless continued to advance on the hostile positions in the face of intense fire, attacking and eliminating a machine gun nest with a rifle grenade. He then continued on into the enemy positions, using his rifle and hand grenades to wipe out a second machine gun nest before being killed by sniper fire. His heroic sacrifice undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his comrades in the subsequent advance of the company. His action, far above and beyond the ordinary call of duty, is in keeping with the finest traditions of the armed forces of the United States and reflects the highest credit on Private POLIO and the military service.

Entered military service from Hazlehurst, Pennsylvania.


First Lieutenant EVERETT E. PRUITT, 01289319, Infantry, 415th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.

On 30 December 1944, Lieutenant PRUITT, a platoon leader, led a six-man patrol across the remains of a destroyed bridge over the Roer River in Germany. When three of his men stepped on enemy mines, becoming casualties, he rendered first aid and ordered his squad to withdraw, dispatching one man to return for litter bearers. Though the area was now heavily subjected to enemy machine gun and small arms fire, Lieutenant PRUITT, with no thought for his own personal safety, alternately fired upon an advancing enemy patrol and assisted his wounded men. When his carbine became jammed, he hurled hand grenades at the enemy, holding them back while his men crossed the bridge. Learning that one of his men was not present, he courageously started to return to the scene of the fighting, despite the known dangers of the mine field and the lurking enemy troops. As he advanced across the bridge, he heard the missing man call to him, saying that he had reached safety by swimming the river. The devotion to duty and great leadership of Lieutenant PRUITT were an inspiration to all. His extraordinary heroism and courageous actions reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Texas.


Captain ROGER S. REES, 0349468, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 19 and 20 November 1944, in Germany.

When a rifle company became disorganized by enemy artillery fire and suffered heavy casualties, Captain REES moved through vicious fire to the company, reorganized and rallied the men, and led a successful attack against a strongly defended village. The following day, Captain REES assumed command of a platoon of tanks, and moving on foot through devastating fire, directed a coordinated tank-infantry attack against a second heavily fortified town. By his personal courage, inspirational leadership, and sound tactical decisions, Captain REES enabled his battalion to successfully capture its objective with a minimum of casualties.

Entered military service from California.


Technician Fourth Grade JESS T. RENTARIA, 37354648, Medical Detachment, 414th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy on 18 and 23 November 1944, in Germany.

Technician Fourth Grade RENTARIA voluntarily left a position of comparative safety, crossed fifty yards of fire-swept terrain, and in the face of intense small arms fire, carried an injured soldier out of danger. Several days later Technician Fourth Grade RENTARIA again braved fierce enemy mortar and machine gun fire as he made five trips over open terrain and evacuated seven severely wounded soldiers. Technician Fourth Grade RENTARIA'S actions resulted in the saving of many lives and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.

Entered military service from Colorado.


Staff Sergeant VINCENT S. ROHAY, 37395054, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 23 February 1945, near Duren, Germany.

During a difficult attack operation across a flooded river, Sergeant Rohay single-handedly knocked out three enemy machine gun nests, which included a pill-box and three groups of entrenched enemy riflemen. Skillfully using his automatic rifle and hand grenades, he engaged in several hand-to-hand struggles, killing at least fifteen and taking fourteen prisoners. His fearless leadership, courage and heroic accomplishments reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces. Entered military service from St. Louis, Missouri.


Private First Class JOSEPH SCHALLMOSER, 36645880, 413th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for action on the night of 23 March 1945, near Kottingen, Germany.

In the face of fierce enemy resistance from well-prepared positions on wooded and commanding terrain, Pfc Schallmoser made his way back approximately 1300 yards to Stockhousen, Germany, fearlessly disregarding the overwhelming storm of enemy artillery, mortar, panzerfaust, and machine gun fire in order to secure tank support for his company. Private First Class Schallmoser then alone rode a tank over the same perilous route, guiding it to his company commander's position. Fire from the tank succeeded in reducing the enemy panzerfaust and small arms fire enough to enable the company to resume the advance. When the platoon commander became a casualty, Private First Class Schallmoser assumed command of the group and with undaunting courage in the face of withering enemy fire, rushed forward shouting commands and exhorting his comrades in the most spirited manner. Under this skillful and extraordinarily aggressive leadership, the enemy was completely routed, and the woods cleared without a casualty. The brilliant leadership, aggressiveness and intrepid gallantry of Private First Class Schallmoser enabled the company to take the town of Kottingen with the fewest possible casualties. His self-assigned actions far above and beyond the normal call of duty exemplify the traditions of the American combat soldier and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Schallmoser.


*First Lieutenant PERRY O. TESTER, JR., 01317703, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy from 28 to 30 November 1944, in Germany.

When four enemy machine guns opened fire upon his platoon, First Lieutenant TESTER, throwing hand grenades and firing his carbine, advanced far forward of his men in an assault which resulted in the complete destruction of the weapons and crews in vicious close-in fighting. While his company withdrew to reorganize for a continuation of the attack, he remained behind, and in the face of intense fire carried a wounded soldier 1,000 yards to an aid station. Leading another assault two days later, First Lieutenant TESTER was severely wounded by a shell fragment. Administering medical aid to himself, First Lieutenant TESTER, despite his pains, continued to lead his platoon in the attack until he was again hit by artillery fire and mortally wounded.

Entered military service from Indiana.


Private First Class BEVERLY TIPTON, 35670069, Infantry, Company I, 413th Infantry, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy in Holland on 25 October 1944.

On 25 October 1944 the platoon to which Private TIPTON was assigned was advancing across flat, open terrain in the face of intense, accurate enemy fire from well prepared dug-in defensive positions in the sparse hedgerows and from points of vantage in the few surrounding buildings. Two squads were pinned down by grazing heavy machine gun, mortar, and small arms fire, and the first scout of Private TIPTON'S squad was killed. Private TIPTON immediately assumed the duties of the first scout, and while leading the squad along a hedgerow to the enemy's flank under the heavy harassing fire, he saw an enemy machine gun. Halting the squad, he worked his way back to the automatic rifleman, obtained the automatic rifle, and moved toward the enemy machine gun nest. Courageously advancing to within six feet of the enemy position, he opened fire, shooting from the hip, killing the members of the machine gun crew and capturing the enemy weapon. Throughout the entire action visibility was good, and Private TIPTON was subjected to direct, aimed fire from three enemy snipers. His spontaneous aggressiveness, bold tenacity, and bravery set an inspiring example for the men of his unit and facilitated the subsequent advance of his unit. Private TIPTON'S courageous actions, above and beyond the ordinary call of duty, were in keeping with the finest traditions of the armed forces of the United States.

Entered military service from Upper Lexington, Kentucky.


*First Lieutenant GEORGE T. VAN GIESEN, 01306023, Infantry, 414th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division; United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against the enemy.

On 8 November 1944, Lieutenant VAN GIESEN, a platoon leader, volunteered to lead a combat patrol against enemy positions which he had located the previous night while on a reconnaissance patrol. While skillfully leading his men over the same route he had passed the night before, he and his men were suddenly subjected to intense machine gun fire which caused many casualties. Realizing that maneuvering was impossible, he ordered his men to withdraw while he, completely disregarding his own personal safety, moved among his wounded men, rendering first aid and moving them to safer positions. This courageous act was done without thought for himself and amid intense machine gun fire which took his life. Lieutenant VAN GIESEN demonstrated a spirit of unselfishness and fearless devotion for his comrades that is an inspiring example for all. The extraordinary heroism and courageous actions of Lieutenant VAN GIESEN reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from California.


Captain WILLIAM B. WHITNEY, 01289180, AUS, Infantry, 414th Infantry Regiment, 104th Infantry Division, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations in Germany on 4 December 1944.

Discovering that two of his men were missing, Captain WHITNEY immediately advanced into the fire-swept area, searched the foxholes and shell-craters, found the two wounded men and personally carried them to safety. Realizing that a frontal assault on an enemy-held railroad embankment would result in heavy casualties, Captain WHITNEY decided to try a bluff. Unarmed and carrying a small, celluloid map-board, Captain WHITNEY briskly walked down the track. Nearing an enemy trench, Captain WHITNEY motioned with his map-board and one enemy rose from his position and surrendered. He continued this action until a total of fifteen of the enemy had surrendered to him. The extraordinary heroism and courageous actions of Captain WHITNEY reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Entered military service from Mississippi.


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